khurramvirani.com

Column: FIFA presidency no laughing matter as would-be candidate becomes frontman for gambling

This was about making a splash. The increase was three-fold for children aged 4-15.

John Leicester is an international sports columnist for The Associated Press. Tuning in for results of football betting pools, which offered big jackpots for small stakes, was a Saturday afternoon ritual for many 20th Century English families.

Imagine, for a moment, a Paddy Power-financed FIFA president. Hull against Aston Villa on Feb. After Thursday’s passing of the entry deadline, “Team Ginola” should fade away.

Whoa. 10 will pit two Asian online bookmakers against each other. In pocketing 250,000 pounds (335,000 euros; US$375,000) from bookmaker Paddy Power for this stunt, Ginola became the latest Trojan horse in the gambling and gaming industry’s creeping and creepy embrace of football.

One of those is Kevin Twaddle, a former player for Motherwell and other Scottish clubs who told his story in the biography, “Life On The Line: How to Lose a Million and So Much More.” He no longer gambles and has delivered talks to other players about the risks.

And how about this blurb from Sky Bet, title sponsor since 2013 of England’s three divisions below the Premier League. But the mere thought of the gambling industry even attempting to place a stooge at the very top of football makes the prospect of another Blatter term seem perhaps not quite so bad.

And that isn’t funny at all.

Ginola has zero chance of unseating Sepp Blatter. In the UK, which liberalized gambling advertising in 2007, adults’ exposure to gambling commercials on television soared five-fold in eight years to 2012, regulator Ofcom found. FIFA’s election and ethics rules will almost certainly keep him off the May ballot. There’s nothing funny about the gambling industry’s latest wheeze to sink its teeth even deeper into football and its fans.

___

Sports and gambling have, of course, long gone together, feeding off each other’s success and growth. What ever happened to sport for sport’s sake, for the buzz of competition, not a bet? How quaint. It won’t happen; FIFA’s ethics rules should see to that. Bet some more.

“It just makes like a mockery of football.”

“It’s an absolute disgrace,” he said in a phone interview. So silky as a player for Newcastle and Tottenham; so ridiculous now with his car-crash campaign for the FIFA presidency.

All this in a sport grappling with the increasing danger of gambling-related match-fixing and with ample examples of gambling-addicted players who frittered away their wealth.

But that’s not the point here. But I mean you’re talking about one of the biggest, powerfulest jobs in football and all you’re getting to hear about is Paddy Power.”

We’re talking here about David Ginola.

But gambling advertising wasn’t as in-your-face as now. Write to him at jleicester@ap.org or follow him at http://twitter.com/johnleicester

That is the message that football, more than most other sports, is mainlining into our homes, helped by names like Ginola and teams lending their cachet, stadiums, jerseys and players to the industry that had cash to splash when the 2008 financial crisis hobbled other sponsors.

PARIS –  Don’t laugh. Bet again. It reads like a plug for Fifty Shades of Grey.

“It’s eyeballs we’re after,” 12Bet executive Rory Anderson, quoted in the Daily Mail, said when the online bookmaker became the name on Hull City’s shirt for this Premier League season.

Asking your kids to make tea during half-time breaks won’t shield them from the bombardment, not with gambling ads flashing throughout matches on pitch-side light-boards. That was before online bookmakers offered odds on anything and everything, from match results and goals scored to which team will win the coin toss or take the first corner, and before their relentless advertising.

Twaddle takes a very dim view of Ginola’s Paddy Power-backed grab for FIFA.

But the targets were our wallets and spending habits, not our hearts. Villa’s shirt sponsor is dafabet, a name that works better in Chinese, where “dafa” means “big wealth.” Stoke and Burnley players are billboards for Bet365 and Fun88 (another name that plays on the Chinese word to get rich).

“I’m here today to talk about love” were the Frenchman’s seductive opening words at his campaign launch in London this month.. “It’s great for Paddy Power. “There’s more passion, more pleasure and more pain.”

Bet. That much was clear from the Paddy Power branding.

Sport “matters more when there’s money on it,” it says


Posted by admin on April 30th, 2015 :: Filed under Uncategorized
You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.